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Our Customers

We're a Winning Team for Our Customers, Our Communities and Each Other

We're a collection of unique individuals who come together as one team to win the hearts of our customers. Bound by a deep desire to have meaning in our lives and work, we joined the Allstate Family of Companies to make a difference.

This means we do the right thing—always.

We never compromise our core values, even when we take on the toughest competitors. We work hard and play fair, engaging in the marketplace with the same honesty, respect and accountability our customers, communities and stakeholders have come to know and expect from us.

Selling and Marketing with Integrity

People with Purpose

…are authentic, honest and accountable when promoting our products and services.

We are here to serve customers who need our help and protection as they plan for their futures. They trust us to tell the truth and deliver on our promises. By representing our products and services with honesty and integrity, we give customers the best chance to choose what is right for them. Honoring our core values in this way earns customer loyalty, enhances our reputation and strengthens our ability to grow and thrive in a competitive global marketplace.

Purpose in Practice

Selling and marketing with integrity means we:

  • Avoid exaggeration, misrepresentation and deception
  • Only make claims about our products and services that can be substantiated
  • Never make false or misleading claims about competitors' products and services
  • Deal fairly with customers, suppliers and competitors
  • Never take advantage of anyone through manipulation, concealment or abuse of privileged information
  • Comply with the letter and spirit of all laws and regulations in all markets where we do business

 

leadership

in action

leadership in action

I took a call at a Customer Contact Center from someone shopping for auto insurance. He mentioned a competitor's product and asked my opinion of it. My honest belief is that it's inferior to what we're offering. Can I say this?

We are committed to selling our products and services based on their competitive merits, not by disparaging the product and service offerings of a competitor. In the interest of transparency, you may offer a comparison. However, when you talk about a competitor's products, you must stick exclusively to what you know to be both factual and current, separate from your opinions. In this case, it's best to focus the discussion on our own product and its value and benefits.

Safeguarding Our Assets and Information

People with Purpose

…treat all company assets with care and respect, and safeguard them from misuse.

Our assets are critical to our sustained growth and success. They give us a competitive edge in the marketplace. Each one, from our buildings, computer systems and investments to our sensitive information and reputation, represents the hard work we have all put in. We all share the responsibility to protect those assets from mistreatment. We act as leaders when we take accountability for ensuring company assets are always used efficiently, fairly and properly.

women sitting at table and talking

Purpose in Practice

Safeguarding our assets and information means we:

  • Take robust steps to prevent loss, damage, theft, waste and misuse of all company assets, both physical and intangible
  • Use company assets for business purposes only, except for minimal personal use
  • Obtain, secure and destroy company information according to company policy
  • Never remove, sell, lend, borrow or dispose of assets without authorization
  • Are cost-conscious when we incur expenses or purchase assets for the Company
  • Seek reimbursement only for true business-related expenses
  • Treat customer and supplier assets as carefully as we do our own
  • Report any instance where it seems company assets might be misused

To report the mistreatment of company assets, contact your manager or see Resources.

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"Assets" can refer to many things, including:

  • Information assets, such as any data related to our business, regardless of how it is created, used or stored
  • Financial assets, such as money, financial instruments or anything that can be converted into money
  • Physical assets provided to employees to conduct business, such as phones, computers, buildings, vehicles and office supplies
  • Intangible assets, such as ideas, inventions, copyrights, trademarks, patents, trade secrets and our reputation

Using Information and Communications Systems Responsibly

People with Purpose

…respect and protect company communications equipment and systems, treating them with care and professionalism.

Purpose in Practice

Using information and communications systems responsibly means we:

  • Safeguard company information and data against loss, theft, damage and unauthorized access
  • Do not store company information on personal systems or equipment, unless permitted in a company-sponsored technology program
  • Never use company systems or devices for activities that are illegal or that violate our policies and core values, including access, storage or distribution of:
    • Illegal, pornographic, obscene, offensive, harassing or discriminatory content
    • Unauthorized mass distributions, chain letters, pyramid schemes, gambling, commercial ventures or games
    • Large personal files of visual or audio material
    • Material that violates others' intellectual property rights
    • Malware or other content that compromises our security
    • Unauthorized software
  • Do not share passwords or details of other access controls
  • Minimize personal use of company equipment and systems

For more information, see Resources.

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Acceptable personal use of company assets means use that does not reduce the value of those assets, create additional costs, involve inappropriate content, affect job duties and productivity, or put the Company at risk of liability.

Preventing Insider Trading

People with Purpose

…never use or disclose material, nonpublic information about Allstate or another company improperly.

Purpose in Practice

Preventing insider trading means we:

  • Never buy or sell related securities if we are personally aware of material, nonpublic information about Allstate, its subsidiaries or any other company
  • Do not "tip"—the direct or indirect passing of material, nonpublic information about any company to someone who might use it in a trade
  • Use strict security measures to protect sensitive information
  • Protect material, nonpublic information from unauthorized disclosure

Insider trading cheats shareholders, distorts markets and erodes the trust of those we serve. It's a serious violation that can carry significant penalties. For more information, see Resources.

woman smiling and standing with arms crossed

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"Inside information" is material, nonpublic information about the Allstate Family of Companies or another company that a reasonable investor would consider important in making an investment decision. Information or events that could be considered potentially material include:

  • Mergers, acquisitions, dispositions, tender offers or joint ventures
  • Earnings information, including earnings forecasts or other unpublished financial information
  • Major changes in management or strategy
  • Significant new contracts or partnerships
  • Decisions to expand or reduce operations
  • Significant litigation or regulatory examinations or investigations

Protecting Confidential and Restricted Information

People with Purpose

…take careful and vigorous measures to prevent any unauthorized use of sensitive information.

We recognize that our information assets are vital and distinguish us from competitors. We are committed to protecting all company information but especially our confidential and restricted information, as well as any sensitive business partner information entrusted to us. Information security is everyone's responsibility, even if you discontinue your employment.

employees gathered around laptop on desk

Purpose in Practice

Protecting confidential and restricted information means we:

  • Identify and properly classify confidential and restricted information
  • Take appropriate security measures when storing or sharing such information
  • Share it only on a need-to-know basis for a legitimate business reason, even with colleagues, unless otherwise required by law
  • Never discuss it in public areas or forums
  • Never use it for personal gain or to benefit people outside the Company
  • Properly destroy or return all copies of sensitive information when we leave the Company
  • Never request or accept sensitive information unless we believe it's absolutely necessary
  • Report any suspected breach to Allstate Information Security by emailing AIS-CSIRT@allstate.com as soon as possible

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"Confidential or restricted information" can mean:

  • Nonpublic financial information or projections
  • Marketing plans
  • Proprietary processes, formulas, products or services
  • Intellectual property, patents and trade secrets
  • Information about investments or proposed transactions
  • Pricing strategies
  • Company-developed software and related documents
  • Business partner information
  • Certain operating procedure
  • Personal information of any individual (employee, agent, consumer or customer)

For more information, see Resources.

leadership

in action

leadership in action

I recently received an email from an external business partner, which appears to have confidential information in it. I think she didn't notice because it was part of an older chain of replies near the bottom of the email. Should I bother telling the partner or just not bring it up since I would never misuse or disclose the information anyway?

You should still warn the partner. That way, you could help prevent similar accidental disclosures in other emails the partner sends, which will likely be appreciated. It's our policy to always attempt to return confidential information if we believe it was shared with us by mistake. In this case, reply to only the sender (deleting the confidential information so it does not continue to be shared). Let her know that the email possibly contained information that she may not have meant to disclose, and ask her to resend you the important message without the confidential information. If the sender asks you to delete the prior email, do so.

Protecting Personal Data

People with Purpose

…safeguard everyone's personally identifiable information and protect it from unauthorized or accidental access, use, disclosure or misuse.

With a presence in four distinct insurance segments and operations around the world, we are entrusted with the personal data of millions of individuals. We take our obligation to protect that data very seriously. Not keeping this information secure could impact the lives and futures of real people. We respect the privacy of all individuals and take the necessary and legally required precautions to protect personal data and prevent the harm caused by unauthorized access.

men looking at laptop on table

Purpose in Practice

Protecting personal data means we:

  • Comply with all company policies and applicable privacy laws regarding information protection, as well as the collection, storage, sharing and destruction of personally identifiable information
  • Request and retain only as much personal information as necessary and share it only on a need-to-know basis for legitimate business reasons as permitted by law, even with colleagues
  • Never leave personal information where it can be easily accessed
  • Are transparent about the information we collect, use and share, as well as what we use it for and how we share it
  • Invest in and use robust information protection controls, systems and security procedures
  • Contact our Compliance or Privacy team immediately through the Speak Up Process if we know of or suspect a possible breach

For more information, see Resources.

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Personally identifiable information (PII) is information that identifies or can be used to identify a person. PII can be information about customers, employees, agents or claimants. It can include, but is not limited to, a Social Security or tax ID number, driver's license number, bank account number, credit card number, date of birth or other information someone might not want to share publicly.

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in action

leadership in action

Another claim representative in my office has been out with an illness. One of her customers called and asked for her address in order to send flowers. Can I give out her address?

We want to build strong relationships with customers, but it's not appropriate to give out the representative's personal address or information about a facility where she may be getting treatment. The customer could send something to your office, and leadership would ensure it gets to her.

Competing Fairly

People with Purpose

…deliver superior performance on the strength of our products and people—ever through unfair competitive practices.

The marketplaces in which we function require free and fair competition to operate properly. Without it, consumers cannot determine which products and services are right for them. That's why governments make laws promoting fair competition (known as "antitrust laws" in the U.S. and "competition laws" elsewhere). They prohibit activities that restrain competition, create monopolies, abuse market positions or distort the marketplace. We follow these laws wherever we do business, not simply to avoid legal liability and significant fines but because it's the right thing to do for our customers, our communities and other stakeholders. Our core values of honesty, caring and integrity demand it.

woman sitting at desk smiling

Purpose in Practice

Competing fairly means we:

  • Achieve competitive advantages through superior performance and not through unethical or illegal business practices
  • Do not boycott specific suppliers or customers
  • Never discuss, make or appear to make improper agreements with, or collude with, competitors about:
    • Markets
    • Territories
    • Pricing
    • Contracts
    • Bids or quotes
    • Customers
    • Costs
  • Avoid any activity that might unfairly limit competition, distort the free market or appear to abuse a dominant market position

Competition laws are complex and vary by location. Even the appearance of an improper agreement can be a big problem. If you suspect you're at risk of violating these laws, contact your manager, the appropriate corporate legal contact or Human Resources. To learn more, see Resources.

leadership

in action

leadership in action

I was in a group conversation while between seminars at a recent industry conference. The conversation turned to the states we do business in and what we were doing about some of the problem areas. One person asked me if any of our companies were considering not doing business in a certain geographical area. Is this type of conversation with other companies in the industry permissible under our Code?

No, it is not permissible under our Code. Given the scope of antitrust laws, we want to avoid even the appearance of improper agreements, and continuing the conversation might mean running that risk. It's best to politely exit whenever conversations turn toward subjects protected by antitrust or competition laws.

Gathering Competitive Intelligence Fairly

People with Purpose

…learn about competitors in ways that are transparent, legal and ethical.

We need to obtain information about our competition to make strategic business decisions. However, our integrity compels us to treat our competitors the way we would expect to be treated: fairly and honorably. That's how we do business, no matter how high the stakes. We never resort to unethical means to compete.

employees talking in hallway

Purpose in Practice

Gathering competitive intelligence fairly means we:

  • Rely on publicly available information, such as published articles, regulatory filings and online posts
  • Conduct market research, either directly or through external agencies
  • Never seek or accept information if obtained illegally or unethically, such as through bribery or theft
  • Never accept confidential information without the owner's consent
  • Avoid competitor information if we know we're not meant to obtain it
  • Never seek confidential or proprietary information from job applicants or current employees who worked for a competitor
  • Respect the terms of confidentiality agreements that competitors make with members of the Allstate Family of Companies

leadership

in action

leadership in action

I recently attended an industry event near our office. As I left the room, I noticed a notebook on the floor and opened it to find out whom it belonged to. I quickly realized it belonged to a competitor. What should I do with it? Normally I would just turn it in to the lost and found, but in this case, I want to make sure that the owner gets it back and also to be upfront that I was the one who found it.

Your instincts are right. In this case, the right thing to do is not only to return the notebook but also to be clear that you briefly had it in your possession. If practical, immediately return or determine next steps to return the notebook to its owner. In either case, contact the appropriate corporate legal contact or Human Resources, or follow the Speak Up Process to advise someone of the situation.

ECC Monitor: OK